Bringing their dog along on a road vacation adds to the experience for most pet owners. However, many have questions and worries about how to endure van life with dogs before they go. No need to worry; many people take a road trip with one or more dogs in their van every year. It’s simple once you understand what you’re doing.

This campervan dog guide will teach you how to make your van safe and comfortable for your furry buddy and identify pet-friendly campsites and caravan parks. It also provides the best campervan dog tips and tricks. Also included is a helpful packing list for travelling with your dog.

How to Live in a Van With Your Campervan Dog

campervan dog

Are you ready to take your dog on an experience of a lifetime? Check out the recommendations below first to make life on the road more enjoyable for everyone.

Bring an Up-To-Date File With All Vaccination and Veterinary Records, and Ensure It Is Easily Accessible.

It’s best to keep your dog’s immunisation records in a safe place just in case you need them. Be sure to keep them in a secure, well-organised location and easy to get to.

Build Trust and Get Used to Having Them off Leash.

Off-leash dogs are happier, but some early trust-building is essential. Begin by allowing them to go for brief amounts of time and rewarding them with goodies and praise every time they return to you. They’ll be racing joyously through the woods soon, and you’ll smile as you watch them. Furthermore, if you never let them off the leash, they are more inclined to misbehave when you do.

Explore Terrific Dog Parks for Exercise and Interpersonal interactions.

Dog parks are not only fantastic for exercise but also for socialisation. If you live a rural life, your dog may require more socialisation with humans and other dogs. There are also several fantastic dog parks that your dog will enjoy exploring.

Have a Dog Towel On Hand to Dry Them Off Before Putting Them In the Van.

Ensure you have all the cleaning supplies you’ll need to clean up after your dog in the vehicle. Sweep the floor and chairs with a small brush and dustpan to remove dog hair, dust, and debris. If you notice that your dog loses a lot of hair, you might want to consider brushing it on a regular basis.

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If your dog has been swimming, dry them with a microfiber towel before reintroducing them to the van. Sprinkle baking soda over the materials and rub it with a brush to eliminate wet solid dog odours in your car. Let the baking soda soak overnight before vacuuming the next day.

Have a Specific Location Set Out for Storing Your Dog’s Belongings.

It is crucial to keep your vehicle organised, and there are numerous creative storage options you can apply to ensure that there is a place for everything, including the things you need to transport for your dog.

Make Certain That They Get Enough of Exercise.

A dog that is well-behaved will naturally become tired, just as a dog that is joyful will eventually become exhausted. Take your dog for a stroll, a hike, or a run. Play tug-of-war, fetch, or catch. Whatever you do to keep your dog active on a daily basis, make it a habit. Your dog will appreciate it, you will create a stronger relationship with your pet, and your life will be much simpler.

Make Certain That Your Dog Is Microchipped and Collared.

Don’t take the chance of losing your dog while on vacation. Get your campervan dog microchipped before you start your RV life. In the worst-case situation, your odds of locating them are far higher. Also, make sure your dog wears a collar with an identifying tag and your contact information.

When you arrive at your location, your dog will most likely get ecstatic and begin following new scents or animals. Put them on a collar or leash with a sturdy rope before getting out of the van. If your dog is well-behaved, you may be allowed to let them off the leash once they’ve calmed down.

Make Travel Plans for Your Dog’s Comfort.

It primarily implies avoiding high heat during the summer, but avoiding extreme cold is also a good idea. Most dogs do not do well in high heat or cold, so consider the weather when arranging van life routes. Visit colder camping locations in the summer and warmer areas in the winter.

Reduce the Amount of Time Your Dog Stays In the Vehicle.

campervan dog

Limit the time your pet spends alone in the van. Look for pet-friendly facilities such as cafés or public parks while planning your day’s itinerary. While the temperature is being checked, one of you should stay behind to keep your pet company.

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Prepare Your Van for Your Dog’s Comfort.

If you’re not cautious in the summer, the inside of your vehicle might get extremely hot. There are, however, a few things you can do to make yourself and your campervan dog more comfortable:

  • Set up a ventilation fan. A vent fan and a cracked window keep air moving throughout your vehicle, taking out hot air and drawing in cooler air.
  • Install reflecting window treatments. The majority of the heat enters through your windows. Reflective window covers assist in directing radiant heat away from your van.
  • Get yourself a cooling cloth. Even when it’s hot outside, they will keep your dog cool.
  • Ensure that your dog gets enough water. Keep a full water bowl handy and encourage your dog to drink frequently.

Consider the activities, lodging, and restaurants you will visit on your road trip. If you wish to take your campervan dog, it is preferable to arrange mostly outside activities. If your trip involves largely indoor activities, think about leaving your dog at home with friends or relatives.

Teach Them Useful Travel Instructions.

One of the most important things you can do is dedicate enough time to properly training your dog. Before you embark on your van life adventure, teach your dog to be well-behaved and react to your directions. It is critical for your dog’s safety that it can sit, stay, and come when called.

Campervan Dog Packing List

campervan dog

When travelling with a dog, use this packing list. Along with these road trip necessities, you’ll need to include a few other supplies for your campervan dog:

Airtight Storage

It’s containers for dog food and other canine supplies in your campervan.

Baby Wipes

Great for removing stains and various types of gunk from your car.

Bowls for Dogs

Instead of bringing your regular dog bowls from home, try purchasing a set of collapsible travel bowls to conserve room in your car.

Brush, a Dustpan, and a Portable Vacuum

It removes dog hair, dirt, and filth from your vehicle.

Brush for Dogs

If your dog sheds a lot of hair, brush it regularly to limit the amount of hair in your truck.

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Carrier for Dogs

If your dog is little and not physically capable of completing lengthy and strenuous excursions, consider bringing a dog carrier so that you may finish your walk while carrying your dog the rest of the way.

Collar

Keep your dog under control and have a name tag with your contact details. Attach a collar light to your dog’s collar so you can see where he is at night. If you’re worried about your dog running away, consider purchasing a GPS collar.

Dog Bed

Provide a nice sleeping area for your dog. Some portable dog beds are machine-washable and may be laundered.

Dog Snacks and Food

Remember to feed and entertain your dog while you’re on the road.

Harness

It’s comfier for your dog than a collar and gives you more control.

Seat Coverings 

Invest in a pair of durable and easy-to-clean leather, vinyl, or microfiber seat covers. Alternatively, use old towels or sheets.

Tether or Leash

Put it on your dog’s collar to keep it in check. Consider buying a hands-free leash that you can put around your waist on treks if you’re highly active.

Toys for Dogs

Keep your dog engaged while camping and driving.

Travel Cage or Dog Seat

When driving, provide your dog with a secure and pleasant spot to sit and sleep.

Vaccination Records for Your Dog

Just in case you need them at a border crossing or a veterinarian appointment.

Water Bottle for Your Dog

You want to stay focused on the dog’s water bowl while driving. Consider purchasing a portable dog water container instead.

Conclusion

Bringing a dog along on your van life experience may be a perfect fit if you’re prepared to take the time to educate your dog correctly, keep them active, allow them to be themselves, and pay attention to their needs. In exchange, you’ll get a devoted friend who will encourage you to laugh and enjoy yourself every day, as well as the unique link of unconditional love that comes with dog ownership. Sure, you may be unable to visit certain locations or participate in certain activities because you are travelling with a campervan dog. However, witnessing the excitement in your dog’s eyes as you explore the world together is more than worth any disadvantages.